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 Post subject: Too Much Oil?
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 11:48 
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Location: Essex UK
Just a thought, Is it possible to oil an instrument too much. I have seen recommendations to oil a couple of times a year. If it is an Ochre painted Mago for example could over oiling cause the oil to eventually seep right through the wood until in affects the artwork?? Seems a reasonable presumption too me, :scratch: Can I have your thoughts or experiences on this one please

thanks

Paul

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 12:15 
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Yes, I think you can oil an instrument too much.

I don't oil my sticks generally. If they come having been oiled once I tend not to do it again. I'm a bit of a purist in this regard and prefer my sticks as raw as possible, but understand why some prefer to oil theirs. I have so many instruments that I generally play them each only for short periods of time as opposed to long drawn out sessions which would have more of a detrimental impact on the stability of the instrument, and in which case oiling would be a good idea.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 12:16 
Paul

I think it would depend on what oil you are using eg Danish oil tends to put a thin layer on the surface and drys quiet hard with a varhish type effect due to chemicals in the mix.

if its tung oil that penetrates a bit deaper (not much though) and polymerises (what ever that means) creating a moistuior barrier wether the oil then penetrates it self months later is a different matter

I tend to prefer Danish oil myself as it lifts the sound a little with the varnish effect but its personal preferance some people dont oil at all.

as for seaping through ive only heard of that once and it was on a really thin walled old mago that had just dried out to much


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 13:08 
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Joined: 18.03.2006, 03:07
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Location: Pennsylvania, USA
I do oil my instruments as I find it's a good insurance policy not just from overplaying but also against environmental variables as well. I would agree that it is indeed possible to oil too frequently, and once or twice a year is probably sufficient. I oil when a new batch arrives just to give it a little extra stability.

I've got a good number of instruments as well, so no single one gets played too frequently and extensively, so the bores are adequately cured.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 13:41 
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Joined: 23.06.2006, 15:36
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Location: Manchester England
Must admit

I've never oiled any of my sticks

It does make em' sound brighter but it just depends on what sound you like

I have also wondered how effective it is at preventing splitting etc......


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 14:03 
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Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Quote:
It does make em' sound brighter but it just depends on what sound you like


Not so much with tung oil after it dries, I find- it's the least invasive treatment I know. When wet, it does make the tone a bit brighter and crisper- similar to the tone of a water-sluiced bore.


Last edited by flyangler18 on 07.07.2007, 18:00, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 14:05 
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Location: Manchester England
Quote:
water-sluiced bored


You've sluiced water through your sticks Jason :shock: :shock: :shock: :?:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 06.07.2007, 14:09 
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Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Quote:
You've sluiced water through your sticks Jason


Oh no, but I've played an older mago that had been sluiced at a festie here in the states a few years back-the mago player accompanying Bill Harney did it frequently.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 07.07.2007, 00:23 
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stockie wrote:
I tend to prefer Danish oil myself as it lifts the sound a little with the varnish effect but its personal preferance some people dont oil at all.


Thanks Stockie

Have used Danish oil extensively before in wood renovation(antique clocks) and think it is the best thing ever, beats all that thick sticky varnish. I have 6 genuine aboriginal didges (not Mago or Yidaki) two of which were unsealed. These I treated with Danish oil and they have turned out really well. I also have at present 3 Yidaki and one Mago (soon to be two). With these I wanted to protect them, but be as least invasive as I could. 3 out of the 4 were unsealed and one is ochre, I used a mixture of Pure Tung oil, Boiled linseed oil and Eucalyptus oil and I am pleased with the results, took a while to dry but the sound doesn't seem affected at all. Just need to make sure there are no leaks before oiling (it WILL find the smallest crack) and watch for any oil running onto the artwork at the ends, especially if its ochre.

Paul

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 07.07.2007, 17:54 
Quote:
Just need to make sure there are no leaks before oiling (it WILL find the smallest crack) and watch for any oil running onto the artwork at the ends, especially if its ochre.



Hi Paul what you might want to do if you do find some cracks is use (and I alwys get the name wrong) but I would swear by it is Captin tullys creeping crack its a marine product you can get in chandelers and off the net and is a watered down PVA and will seal the crack from the outside.

and up to you you may want to think about somehow sealing the art work before oiling ith ether a lacker (hair spray may work or what I would use is a watered down PVA that you can either paint on with a brush or get it really thin you could spray on with a plant sprayer. Im sure other people on the forum will have some equally goodc advice.

ive used PVA in the past and then put a couple of coats of danish on top to seal the PVA so it doesnt get that milky thing happening when it gets slightly moist (Que "Carry On Film" Sound Effects).

its all up to you and what you feel confident with and how much of a purist you are eg Kyle wouldn't do that myself and Kango would split them down the middle and totally re work them.....

try a small area on the didge with whatever you want to try and see what the results are for you.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 08.07.2007, 23:22 
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Thanks Stockie

I have sealed the exterior of an ochre mago befgore using an artists varnish by Windsor&Newton (their Galeria Range) called acrylic mediums matt varnish. This is truly matt and is virtually undetectable once dried. I only use one coat and it is quite scary as the white ochre goes transparent until dried then it returns to normal. Only use this if the ochre is stable and not powdery, otherwise it may be advisable to try to spray it instead. To be honest I wouldn't use anything on the exterior of an instrument that altered the artists intented finish, ie: Matt must be Matt. Likewise with satin and gloss finishes, everyone to their own tho!! Not sure how effective this would be at sealing any hairline cracks tho. I suppose if I had to then I would seal with PVA or something similar and then put my Matt Varnish over the top to give it back the authentic look again.

Paul

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 09.07.2007, 00:50 
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I never knew didge's needed to be (or could be) oiled, and reading this made me wonder about mine! But thinking about it, I realized some aren't sealed with.. sealant.

The way I understand it, more authentic didges (magos, right?) are just wooden and aren't sealed with any chemical, because thats how aboriginals would normally have theirs. Mine though, is has a glossy protective varnish inside and out, so there's probably no reason to oil. Do you guys think it makes any difference in sound, being varnish-coated or not? Point out my inaccuracies if there are any, I'm still a didge n00b.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 09.07.2007, 01:34 
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EarthSeek wrote:
I never knew didge's needed to be (or could be) oiled, and reading this made me wonder about mine! But thinking about it, I realized some aren't sealed with.. sealant.

The way I understand it, more authentic didges (magos, right?) are just wooden and aren't sealed with any chemical, because thats how aboriginals would normally have theirs. Mine though, is has a glossy protective varnish inside and out, so there's probably no reason to oil. Do you guys think it makes any difference in sound, being varnish-coated or not? Point out my inaccuracies if there are any, I'm still a didge n00b.


Hi EarthSeek

A big and sometimes contoversial subject this!!
Basically, in a nutshell. All wood expands and contracts a varying amount dependant on its environment. Yidaki/Mago/ didges etc are subjected to periods where warm air, spit and god knows what are blown down them which can soak the inside and are then left to dry in our homes which are often centrally heated one minute and then cold the next. The inside gets wet, the outside drys out(CRACK). Many purists do not want to oil their instruments, but these guys know what they are doing, either they dont play an instrument so much that it gets soaked of they keep them in a humidity controlled environment, at least once they have finished playing, to minimse the risk of cracking, or both. Oiling the inside either with a varnish like substance like Danish oil/PVA or a less invasive one like tung oil will protect the inside against ingress of moisture and minimze the risk of cracking. Hard setting varnishes will brighten the sound a bit whilst tung oil etc will have mimimal effect once soaked in and dry. Sealing the outside can also add further protection. Again, what you put on the outside is dependant on the type of paint used for the artwork, damage can be done is this is not approached correctly. If yours have a glossy finish on the inside and out then it looks as though they have been sealed already, check inside tho and see that the sealer is all the way through as sometimes it is only painted a few inches down from either end, whilst the middle remains unsealed. I personally will not even play a new instrument until I have oiled it and even then I have a humidifier in my front room where I keep them to help keep the humidity stable. Aboriginals may be able to replace them if they crack, they cost me a lot of money, I can't do that. I want to keep them, use them for my lifetime and hand them down to my children to enjoy, when iv'e gone.

hope this helps

Paul

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 10.07.2007, 09:05 
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 29.08.2007, 12:20 
just on this topic but slightly different about sloosing out with water, I know its generally a no no with un oiled instroments but is it ok to sloose out an instrument that has been coated several times in Danish oil. IE will the danish be a sufficiant water barrier or could it still split the stick.


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