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 Post subject: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 17.02.2013, 23:53 
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Joined: 16.02.2013, 18:18
Posts: 4
Hi,all: I wasn't really sure where to put my first post, but need dictates that I begin here. I just acquired a really nice stick, made by Norman Lane in approximately the early 1990s. I do not believe it was ever played, except perhaps by Norman when testing it out, and foolishly perhaps, I started playing it, a little at first, but then longer duration, and the last time it developedy a few small hairline cracks near the top, but enough to let air through. It still sounds really nice, but I need to do something about the cracks, and possibly use some kind of oil or other moisturizer or preservatives. Hopefully I will be able to upload some pictures both of the stick and close-up of the cracks.  I know it happens, but I still feel really bad about it, and can anyone offer some suggestions?

Also, how exactly do you apply the oil, ie, just pour it in and roll it around?; and is there a brand name someone has had good results with?  And re: beeswax, do you just stuff it in the crack till flush with the body?

Cheers,

Seth


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crack 2 3.jpg
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full didge.jpg
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 Post subject: Re: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 18.02.2013, 09:43 
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Joined: 20.03.2006, 10:41
Posts: 1503
Location: UK
Nice looking stick! Those cracks, if leaking, will need a real repair before oiling the instrument (if you choose to). I would probably fill those with a mixture of fine sawdust and glue which will be pretty hard to see once dried. Alternatively, you could just squeeze some PVA glue into the cracks. Historically, cracks like this would have been filled with sugarbag beeswax, which works but is not a permanent solution.

I'm sure I remember there being instructions on how to oil an instrument on here somewhere - although there are definitely instructions on the serioussticks.com website. You don't need to oil your didgeridoo, but it will prolong the working life of the instrument, especially if you live in a climate with varying temperatures and humidity. Just make sure you effect any repairs and that they are totally dry before applying any oil as it will leak through the cracks and can stain the artwork on the exterior.

Hope this helps!

Kyle


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 Post subject: Re: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 19.02.2013, 05:36 
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Joined: 16.02.2013, 18:18
Posts: 4
Thanks, Kyle!

Could you tell me how much sawdust to glue, and what would you use to fill the cracks, which are actually quite fine; a toothpick, needle, etc.?


Regards,

Seth


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 Post subject: Re: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 19.02.2013, 16:35 
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Joined: 20.03.2006, 10:41
Posts: 1503
Location: UK
Hey Seth,

There's no exact recipe. I've actually used charcoal powder in the past, although that sets firmer and is black. I'd use a really fine sawdust powder and mix it with glue until it's wet enough to be pressed into the cracks with your finger. Then wipe away any residue and let it dry. It shouldn't be too hard.

Kyle


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 Post subject: Re: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 19.02.2013, 17:46 
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Joined: 05.06.2008, 00:03
Posts: 65
I use a switchblade / Penknife, to carefully run through the crack around 7 times or so, just to open it up a little, and make it slightly more exposed. I then get a little sand paper, sand down the inside of the bell of the instrument, until I have a nice tiny pile of sawdust to collect, in which I then put into the exposed crack. I then use my blade, pushing and packing down the sawdust into the crack, and repeat this, until I cannot stuff anymore into that baby. Then, I take some good old fashioned super glue, and apply it directly over the crack, (which is now packed to the brim with sawdust), and the sawdust just soaks that bad boy up. I then apply more so that the glue is slightly spilling out, and then I leave it for about an hour. After that hour has passed, I then sand over the entire crack, until all is flush and smooth, and all done. Works for me 100% all the time. If you're into cosmetic appearance, be careful; as I'm not in the slightest, and am only interested in the sound, apply with joy!
One last thing, I would never, hands down, 1000% oil the inside of the instrument. It will change the sound forever, and you'll lose that dry, muddy, cherished sound.
Kyle's post was more than enough to help you, and I just wanted to throw in my 7 cents too.
Good luck, and all the very best,

Zed.


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 Post subject: Re: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 03.03.2013, 00:57 
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Joined: 16.02.2013, 18:18
Posts: 4
Hi again....I was just about to go the sadist paste route, when someone told me that I should use Elmer's Probond wood filler instead. But no one mentioned that at all here! Has anyone used it on a didge crack repair, or know how it compares to using a fine sawdust/pva mix, or even make a difference? Perhaps a reason not to use it.

Thanks

Seth


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 Post subject: Re: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 03.03.2013, 00:59 
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Joined: 16.02.2013, 18:18
Posts: 4
Hi again....I was just about to go the sadist paste route, when someone told me that I should use Elmer's Probond wood filler instead. But no one mentioned that at all here! Has anyone used it on a didge crack repair, or know how it compares to using a fine sawdust/pva mix, or even make a difference? Perhaps a reason not to use it.

Thanks

Seth

Ps...sorry, that should read sawdust. (not "sadist")!


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 Post subject: Re: Heartbreak Redux
PostPosted: 10.03.2013, 16:43 
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Joined: 18.03.2006, 05:35
Posts: 307
Location: Alpine , California
the probond would be fine. In my opinion we lean towards pva/sawdust as thats the method most commonly used today to do these repairs by the makers. Pva has another distinct advantage: neatness. Once filed surface can be scraped with a soft flat to flush filer. Moistened paper towel will clean up any on outside of didge. Once fuly dry oiling didge will help keep cracks from opening.

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Alpine California, the didgerido capitol of Southern California :)


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