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 Post subject: To oil or not to oil?
PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 18:12 
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Joined: 15.05.2006, 01:57
Posts: 7
I was wondering if anyone here has tung oiled their Yidaki? If so I was was wondering if the sound is changed dramatically after the oil polymerizes? Is is generally better to oil or not to oil?

Thanks!

Brian


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 18:45 
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Joined: 18.03.2006, 00:50
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Location: Canada
Hi there

Tha big question ! All the yidaki and the one who is coming in this week :) are already oiled .I think it change the sound of the instrument a bit but not dramaticaly ,well less dramatic than a cracked yidaki... :roll:

GGW


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PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 18:49 
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Location: Pennsylvania, USA
When the oil is still wet, it sounds similar to the way that a water-sluiced yidaki sounds, a bit crisper. This will go away as the oil polymerizes-- I use a 2:1 mix of tung oil and citrus solvent to enhance penetration.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 19:35 
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I played a really nice Djalu a few weeks ago that responded wonderfully to every trad technique i could give it. Then it was tung oiled and didn't respond properly at all. I played it again this afternoon now the oil has soaked in and cured and it plays wonderfully again. Awesome stick...

Image

My own yidaki are untouched by oil. My Djalu bore is completely natural even at the very ends. They sound pants if i just pick them up and play. They need to be played for about 30 minutes a day for a week or two to fully saturate the wood and then they sound awesome.

Wet untreated wood will naturally sound different to tung oiled wood. Tung oil adds a lot of polymers into the wood and hardens it, it also stops the wood getting fully saturated and the fibres do not absorb as much water and therefore do not compress as much.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 20:53 
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Joined: 22.03.2006, 18:17
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Location: NYC, NY
Brian,

I'm on board with all the posts so far. If well seasoned, I'd just break that baby in and out slowly and not do a thing - but if you feel that your piece is still a bit green and more susceptible to cracking ( even with a decent break-in period ) then I think that oiling is really the best alternative option. I have an older instrument that is untouched, and a newer one that I have oiled similarly to Ben's/Jasons' method above. I've been very happy with these decisions for each piece and as Stan pointed out - I'm fairly confident that if you decide to oil it will eventually return to its almost untouched orig sound.

Best,

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Last edited by itsadidj on 10.06.2006, 17:15, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 21:07 
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Quote:
They need to be played for about 30 minutes a day for a week or two to fully saturate the wood and then they sound awesome.


That makes me a little nervous, Loretta. I've always been careful to slowly break in newly purchased yidaki with something like 5 minute increments over a few weeks, then I play for longer periods of time, but if it works for you, super! I at least want just a little more protection against cracking :)


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PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 21:25 
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I........agree............a................nice................gradual....................break-in.........................period.....................................................................

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 25.05.2006, 23:46 
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flyangler18 wrote:
Quote:
They need to be played for about 30 minutes a day for a week or two to fully saturate the wood and then they sound awesome.


That makes me a little nervous, Loretta. I've always been careful to slowly break in newly purchased yidaki with something like 5 minute increments over a few weeks, then I play for longer periods of time, but if it works for you, super! I at least want just a little more protection against cracking :)

First point is that these are not new yidaki. Second is that one arrived very seriously cracked anyway. Third is that both are now bandaged.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 01:16 
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In any case, I think that an oiling regimen is a good idea to (a) strengthen the wood through polymerization and (b) to decrease the effects of rapid wetting and drying cycles, either from frequent play or environmental variables. Winter oiling is doubly important- cold and dry can wreak havoc on unsealed eucalyptus!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 17:34 
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Location: Sunny Palm Beaches, Florida
How can I tell if my Burrngupurrngu is oiled or not? There appears to be something on the inside of the bell, but not beyond that. It is pretty heavy and thick walled, so does it need oiling or careful breaking in? I prefer to leave it the way it came to me, but oif course Florida has several problems in the environment...it can get extremely hot, especially in a car, and it can get quite humid. Also, when I travel it is very insulated in the plane with the heavy Airliner fishing rod case, but of course temps in the luggaqge area get down below freezing and I haven't been bothering to put warmers in the case.

Do you folks think it should be oiled and if so how do I oil it and where do I get tung oil?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 17:45 
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Quote:
How can I tell if my Burrngupurrngu is oiled or not?


Unless Ben oiled it himself (which I'm sure he would have mentioned), your yidaki has not been oiled. The 'something' on the inside of the bell is most likely PVA glue as a 'sealant' though it is not one. I'm a big proponent of oiling, because the conditions on the East Coast can be pretty extreme. Oiling is a great way to protect against all kinds of environmental variables--- fluctuations in temperature, humidity, etc, and is the least invasive treatment from a cultural authenticity standpoint. The biggest threat to cracking is when there is a big difference between the humidity outside the bore and inside. Wood expands as it absorbs moisture and a crack can develop if the wood is not given time to adjust. A higher humidity environment is better than a dry one-- Arnhemland can have pretty high humidity! John and Christian have some good instructions here: http://serioussticks.com/care/oiling.php?language=en

As a source of pure tung oil and citrus solvent: www.realmilkpaint.com
When I oil my instruments, I did one treatment, then another two months later, then 6 months, then once a year or so, depending on how much you play that yidaki.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 18:33 
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Location: Sunny Palm Beaches, Florida
Hi Jason

THanks for the fast reply. Sounds like quite a process. I don't know if I can do that at my condo...no place to make a mess and let it dry and smell. Hmmm. Probably wouldn't be a bad idea though. Is there anything else besides tung oil or a mixture of oils that could do the trick without the mess or smell? Also, I have a lot of environmental sensitivities and am concerned about the smell from the tung oil.

I read of someone using a thin oil (linseed maybe) on a sponge tied to the end of a rope then pulling it thru the bore. Hard to say whether or not that would give full coverage...but would it be sufficient, maybe pulling it thru several times? It would be something I could do in the condo with less mess perhaps.

Thanks

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 19:02 
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Tung oil is quite neutral in smell. Once cured you can't smell it at all - unlike linseed that stinks like crap paint for ages afterwards.

Linseed is something i would never put down a didge as its polmers are quite gummy.

Also, you should never mix oils as it ruins the polymerisation process.

To oil your didge, put a plastic bag over one end, seal it with a load of elastic bands. Pour in tung oil with 50% solvent, about 100ml. Seal other end with plastic bag and elastic bands. Slosh oil up and down inside.

Take bags of and stand the didge on a cake rack over a bowl for at least five days to drain, absorb and cure. It needs oxygen going through it to cure, not wet breath.

Do it over the bath or the pavement outside. I once had a plastic bag come off. Luckily it was over the bath.

Tung oil is a pure vegetable oil.

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Last edited by Loretta on 26.05.2006, 19:07, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 19:06 
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hi there

Question ,if a didge as already been oiled with linseed oil in the past ,can it be oil with tung oil after ? Thanks

GGW


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 19:09 
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I don't see why not. The polymers are different, but as long as the linseed has polymerised i can't see it affecting the tung.

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