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PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 19:14 
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Location: In ya flower bed...
I forgot to mention Robert, that if the bore is untreated, it'll take several applications. Do the above every other day, 4 times (draining each time) then leave to drain and cure for a week.

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PostPosted: 26.05.2006, 21:59 
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rawfoodguy wrote:
I read of someone using a thin oil (linseed maybe) on a sponge tied to the end of a rope then pulling it thru the bore. Hard to say whether or not that would give full coverage...but would it be sufficient, maybe pulling it thru several times? It would be something I could do in the condo with less mess perhaps.


Whoa, this would be asking for trouble IMHO. Ochre painting gets seriously affected by every little oil drop that spills on it, especially the white. Pulling a soaked sponge through a didge will inevitably create drops and stuff and a general mess everywhere not only from pulling it through the instrument but you'll get oil on your hands as well which inevitably ends up on your instrument.

I definitely wouldn't recommend the plastic bag method either, the risk of oil creeping out on the sides and running down the stick while you turn and tilt it is far too high.

Before oiling an ochre stick, you'll have to check extra carefully for the slightest crack or the smallest leaks aroung knotholes or so. Especially on very nicely painted ochre sticks, they are sometimes almost impossible to find and you might be up for a very unpleasant surprise. Once the oil has seeped out, the damage is done no matter how fast you wipe it off.

I frankly haven't seen a better working method yet than the one that John has developed and that is shown on our website. But it requires two people and some space to do it. We've oiled a fair amount of ochres sticks in the meantime but having to oil one still gives me the willies.


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PostPosted: 27.05.2006, 00:38 
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Location: Sunny Palm Beaches, Florida
seriouschris wrote:
but having to oil one still gives me the willies.


Me too :roll:

I already somewhat screwed up spraying fixative on the ocre colors. Aaargh. The fixative I used was for pastels, so I thought it would work, but the ocre colors sligthly bled, just a tiny bit but noticeable to me close up. Fortunately, it is still a work of art!!! But I wish I just left it alone and let it wear, or not, naturally.

So I think I am (a) gonna try to stop idealizing Aboriginal culture and my didg and (b) gonna follow the advice of another thread I read in a Google search on this, from an Australian site, and just leave it all natural. Let nature take its course. It may crack, or it may not. If it does, then I will just repair the crack. In fact, some Australian woodworkers pointed out that treating the bore with tung oil can cause some woods to crack!!! Following reasonable precautions should prevent problems, and as the woodworkers pointed out eucalyptis is a very dense and strong wood that will not be affected much by the moisture from playing.

My preventative approach is to break it in a bit more consciously, not over-play it in a single session, and rotate it while playing to distribute any moisture more evently. Might be a good idea to tie a string to a rag and bull it thru after playing, like they do on some flutes, to blot up any excessive moisture.

When I met David Bl*n*s* he had his favorite didg with him...and it was held together almost from top to bottom, so help me, with duct tape. But what a sound!

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PostPosted: 27.05.2006, 07:23 
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My first yidaki popped a knot hole when I decided to oil it. The oil obviously leaked out on to the out side and so I had to oil the outer of the whole stick to hide the leak. Luckily it was a fairly undecorated gapabulu stick and now just looks a bit too shiny.

Since then I've decided not to oil my trad sticks and just try and be careful with playing and where I leave them. I've had some thin but long cracks which I've just super glued due to their thinness and left scars and all, no cover ups. And now I figure what the hell it's just part of the sticks history and it plays just the same.

Gaffa/duct tape might come one day if necessary and it seems it is becoming a traditional repair method anyway :D

Guess we've got to accept the imperminanace of life. Or am I just lazy :?

Kev :D


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 Post subject: Cracked didges sound bad.
PostPosted: 27.05.2006, 15:32 
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Location: Alpine , California
I cant imagine draging anything through a bore in a termite made didge- the methods outlined by the serious brothers are right on and simple. There is great cause for concern watching for cracks and knots leaking (isnt this the reason we are sealing?) and dabbing the seeped oil away before it spreads in quantity. Just pay attention- watch the problem areas! Once its standing verticle and dripping out the hard parts over. Sealing is not an option- wood subjected to rapid humidity changes will crack. I am not a museum preserving an artifact in pristine condition. Sealing is my friend. It adds moisture thats been lost back into the wood, closes hairline cracks, and lets me pick up my instrament and play for extended periods.

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PostPosted: 27.05.2006, 19:22 
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Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Quote:
In fact, some Australian woodworkers pointed out that treating the bore with tung oil can cause some woods to crack!!!


There is some speculation that oiling a very dry instrument can cause cracking, but I really don't suspect this will be a problem with your yidaki, as it is clearly your favorite. You've built up a fair amount of moisture in the bore of the instrument already, so the wood is in good shape. The problems arise when you (a) let the yidaki thoroughly dry out for- say, you're ill and not feeling up to playing for a week or so-- then going ripping away at for 45 minutes and (b) you're going back and forth between areas with large humidity differences often. Rapid dry and wetting cycles are the enemy, becauses it causes stress on the wood. Eucalyptus is hard and dense, but things like gradients in the wall thickness, etc can all contribute. But, hey, some yidaki never crack. Randy's got a few good stories to tell there, I would imagine. I wouldn't pull any thing through the bore, personally, and if you're worried about excess moisture, just give the instrument a chance to dry a bit (say, a few hours) standing vertically. Air exchange through the bore will do a lot to level things out. I imagine that it will dry fairly quickly in an air conditioned environment like your condo :wink:


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PostPosted: 28.05.2006, 18:27 
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Hey Loro,
Who's nice looking Djalu you got there 8)


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PostPosted: 28.05.2006, 20:31 
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Location: Sunny Palm Beaches, Florida
Well, after due consideration and with all your well-appreciated input, I am going to stick to my usual all-natural approach. What I will do is play the Burrngupurrngu more regularly (lately I have been playing around with a couple of Ben's sticks), and be cognizant of the moisture and temperature so there are not so many rapid wet and dry cycles and such, and not leave it in the car at all (something I have done a few times in an insulated bag, but it still get hot). I just can't see myself taking any more chances damaging the ocre pigments, for one thing. So I will take my chances and if a crack happens, that will just be nature taking its course and I will do whatever repairs, letting that become part of the charm and history of the didg. Hopefully I won't ever have to resort to traditional duct tape techniques :-)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 28.05.2006, 20:51 
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Joined: 18.03.2006, 21:38
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Location: In ya flower bed...
chalky wrote:
Hey Loro,
Who's nice looking Djalu you got there 8)

Hi Chalky

It's Colin's...

http://forum.serioussticks.com/profile. ... ofile&u=51

It's an F# with a 23 x 25mm natural gob on it. Not only does it look good, but it sings!

You going to Midsummer Didge Camp?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 29.05.2006, 00:32 
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Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Quote:
So I will take my chances and if a crack happens, that will just be nature taking its course and I will do whatever repairs, letting that become part of the charm and history of the didg


I admire your gumption, Robert. It will be awfully tough to match Djul-djul's exquisite line work if a crack does appear.


Last edited by flyangler18 on 30.05.2006, 03:06, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 29.05.2006, 21:30 
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Joined: 27.03.2006, 18:19
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Hi Loro,
No mate I'm on nights :cry:


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PostPosted: 16.03.2007, 23:33 
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Joined: 24.02.2007, 00:24
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Location: France
Hi there...

I've got a few eucalyptus branches drying up since two months now...
I will give a try to sandidj' making this summer (round August... will make 8months... and leave another branch for next summer).
So I'm gathering info' !

Just read here that oiling a didj is especially good if wood is still a bit "fresh" (not totally dry). I guess that this will be the case with my 1st branch this summer.
But can oiling affect the glue used to sandwich ?
And can I oil the didj both inside AND outside (before decoration) ?
I mean, would it be best, for the homogeneity of the wood treatment ?
Or will it be harder/impossible to decorate afterwards ?

Ah and last question > what type of oil is best, besides "didj' oil"... ? I mean, an oil I can find in a "normal" shop :P Is linseed oil ok ?

Thanks for your replies :wink:


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PostPosted: 17.03.2007, 05:07 
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Joined: 22.03.2006, 20:18
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Location: California USA
I think that most of the comments in this thread have been referring to natural termite hollowed instruments.
If you are planning to make a split and hollow type didj from wood that is less than 2 or 3 years dry you will almost certainly regret it.
I speak from experience with this. I have a very nice claro black walnut stick sitting here as I type.....but I carved and glued it up before the wood was completely dry and it has continued to shift and tweak and although it has not actually cracked apart at the glue joints, I know that it probably will some day. So here it sits in my shop as a reminder that curing time is not just an option, it is required.
hope this helps,
robert


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 18.03.2007, 18:51 
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Hi Kellymon... thanks for your warning !

Thing is : I've got 3 big euca' branches and can't wait to test on one of them...
I've blocked humidity escaping from both cut extremities with bee's wax to prevent splitting.
Just today, I've also tried to make ClapSticks with a (much) smaller branch from same tree (cut by gardners at the same time) and wood was indeed still very humid (even in this small branch).

But : the external parts of the branch are the first to dry... The core is the last. And the core is not needed in a Didj, it will be cut out !
So I had in mind to wait 'till august for my 1st branch, shape it, splitt it and hollow both parts on the same day. Put them back together but WITHOUT GLUING THEM, just fixed with collars. Leave the sandDidj' to dry up a few more month > it will them dry much quicker without bark nor core ! Still put beeswax on extremities. Once everything is dryied up (hopefully with no splits...) and wood has worked and deformed, I would then cut edges to make them fit again, and eventually (probably) fill splits with glue and finally glue both parts together...

Well, I know that's all only in my mind and it may turn out to NOT work this way at all finally...

Anyway, my questions concerning oiling sandDidjs is still unanswered :
Can oil affect glue resistance ? Should I oil the hemididjes before gluing them ? Should I only oil once glued ? Should I NOT OIL AT ALL and rather varnish ?

Thanks :wink:


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