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 Post subject: Tony Abbot?
PostPosted: 08.09.2013, 13:35 
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Does anyone have any views about Tony Abbott on the "Indigenous Issue"?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FR8kq52zP4

The vid above sounds positive, but he is from the same party of Johnny Howard.

I am not sure what to think.


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 Post subject: Re: Tony Abbot?
PostPosted: 08.09.2013, 17:14 
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Let's see what Wikipedia (a totally neutral and reliable source of information :P ) says about him :
Quote:
In December 2007, Abbott was assigned the Shadow Portfolio of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.[57] As indigenous affairs spokesman, Abbott said that it had been a mistake for the Howard Government not to offer a National Apology to the Stolen Generations.;[58] spent time teaching at remote Aboriginal communities;[59] and argued for the Rudd Government to continue the Northern Territory National Emergency Response which restricted alcohol and introduced conditional welfare in certain Aboriginal communities.[60]

[...]

During his time as Opposition Spokesman for Indigenous Affairs, Abbott spent time in remote Cape York Aboriginal communities as a teacher, organised through prominent indigenous activist Noel Pearson. Abbott has repeatedly spoke of his admiration for Pearson, and in March 2010, introduced the Wild Rivers (Environmental Management) Bill to Parliament in support of Pearson's campaign to overturn the Queensland government's Wild Rivers legislation. Abbott and Pearson believe that the QLD law will 'block the economic development' of indigenous land, and interfere with Aboriginal land rights.[79]

[...]

As Opposition spokesman on Indigenous Affairs, Abbott spent weeks teaching in a remote Aboriginal settlements in Cape York in 2008 and 2009, organised through indigenous leader Noel Pearson. He taught remedial reading to Aboriginal children; worked with an income management group, helping families manage their welfare payments; and visited children who had not been attending school—with a goal 'to familiarise himself with indigenous issues'.

[...]

Aboriginal affairs

Tony Abbott has had an active interest in Indigenous Affairs. As Opposition Leader, in March 2013, Abbott said that, if elected prime minister, he would prioritise indigenous affairs by placing it within the department of prime minister and cabinet, saying: "There will be, in effect, a prime minister for Aboriginal affairs".[127]

As Health Minister Abbott established the Nurse Family Partnership to improve conditions for indigenous youths. Before becoming Opposition Leader, he served as Shadow Minister for Indigenous Affairs. He has worked closely with Cape York Aboriginal activist Noel Pearson. He has volunteered as a teacher in remote Aboriginal Communities and given an undertaking to continue to live one week a year in such communities if he is elected Prime Minister. He actively supports recognition of Aboriginal people in the Australian constitution. In contrast to his mentor John Howard, as Opposition Leader, Abbott has praised Kevin Rudd's National Apology to the Stolen Generation.[58][59][60][128]

Whilst the Coalition and Labor parties were engaged in negotiations with crossbenchers to obtain minority government in 2010, Noel Pearson lobbied Rob Oakeshott to back Abbott as a "once-in-a-generation" conservative who could lead the way on reconciliation and describing his policies as "more progressive on the question of Aboriginal rights than the Labor and Greens position".[129]

Rising to support the passage of the Gillard Government's historic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Recognition Bill through the House of Representatives in 2013, Abbott said:[130]
“ Australia is a blessed country. Our climate, our land, our people, our institutions rightly make us the envy of the earth, except for one thing—we have never fully made peace with the First Australians. This is the stain on our soul that Prime Minister Keating so movingly evoked at Redfern 21 years ago. We have to acknowledge that pre-1788 this land was as Aboriginal then as it is Australian now. Until we have acknowledged that we will be an incomplete nation and a torn people...

So our challenge is to do now in these times what should have been done 200 or 100 years ago to acknowledge Aboriginal people in our country’s foundation document. In short, we need to atone for the omissions and for the hardness of heart of our forebears to enable us all to embrace the future as a united people."


I find this quite encouraging... But I am not familiar with Australia's political system and I don't know to what extent the prime minister has the power to change things inside his government.

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Fabulous secrets were revealed to me the day I held aloft my magic yidaki and said : « By the power of hard tongue ! I have the Poweeeeer ! »


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 Post subject: Re: Tony Abbot?
PostPosted: 09.09.2013, 22:17 
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Well, things are a little more complicated that they seem at first sight :

Quote:
Aborigines 'must take jobs'

ABORIGINAL men and women must take any job they can get if indigenous disadvantage is ever going to end, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott said.

''There may not be a great job for them but whatever there is, they just have to do it, and if it's picking up rubbish around the community, it just has to be done,'' Mr Abbott said yesterday in Melbourne.

Speaking at the Australia Unlimited 2010 Summit, Mr Abbott said there were no ''cultural excuses'' for indigenous children to miss school or adults to not seek work.


Read more: The Age

Quote:
Sit with us, Mr Howard. We will help you understand

[...]

Abbott has told central Australian Aborigines in Pitjantjatjara lands that spending months on ceremony doesn't work in today's Western culture. He told an Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara meeting that "if you're going to develop a working culture, you can't have a three-month ceremony season and you can't take six weeks off because your cousin has died. I wouldn't imagine that long before white man came (a death) would have stopped hunting."


Read more : The Age

This last article is very interesting : it's an opinion column where three elders from Kunwinjku country in Arnhem Land give their point of view about several nice ideas from the Federal Government (the shortening of the ceremonial time, the closing of the outstations and the removing of all permit system for access to aboriginal lands).

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Fabulous secrets were revealed to me the day I held aloft my magic yidaki and said : « By the power of hard tongue ! I have the Poweeeeer ! »


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